UNDERSTANDING THE STATS –  ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

UNDERSTANDING THE STATS –  ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

JUGGLING

What to look for:  1. Improvement of on average 10-15 touches or more per week.  2. New personal bests (marked with in bold) about 50% of the time, two weeks out of four.  3. With the occasional exception for those taking on the wicked-hard challenges tied to the last touches of Body Parts juggling, three weeks in a row without the bold should not happen.

“Juggling makes every touch better,” and in our experience there is nothing that makes a young player better more quickly than completing the “Weak Foot Only” level of our Juggling Progression.  Repeatedly we see that those who have completed that level (or nearly so) show nearly twice the improvement in their ability to serve a ball for distance and accuracy with the weaker foot when compared to those who have yet to reach that milestone.  On the field observations confirm that the effectiveness of these players and their ability to make an impact on the game also spikes upwards at this point.

POWER SHOT

What to look for:  The most important column is the “dif” one, the percentage that a player’s weak foot scores are of the dominant foot scores.  It is unusual for a youth player to reach the .90 (90%) level, highly unusual to get to .95.  We want every COE player to get to .90 and many to get to .95 if not better.

Look also for consistency within the batches of 4 scores.  When the 4 scores are within a 5 MPH range that indicates the player is close to maxed out for her current size and strength and the technique is strong.

FIGURE 8’S

What to look for:  Each player will make 3, one minute, runs with different dribbling surface restrictions: Right foot, Left foot and Both feet. The score for each run is how many laps are done in .25 increments. If the player uses the wrong foot there is a ¼ point penalty for each time it is used. In this test, we are looking for two things; 1- the difference between the left and right foot (dividing the lowest number by the highest), we want every COE player to get to .90 and many to get to .95 if not better.

 

DISTANCE SERVE

What to look for The Distance Serve has received two innovative features, kicking a moving ball and recording the side (left or right) where the ball first bounced. Kicking a moving ball for distance in addition to a stopped ball mimics the two scenarios where this technique is used in a game, during play or after a whistle. By recording the direction of the ball gives us great insight on any technical tendency a player is showing. The goal here is to have the long distance serve land in the middle of the 5 yard alley. However, if a players ball lands 50-75% on the outer lanes this shows a small technical adjustment is needed to make a difference.

In addition to the looking for the accuracy of each foot, notice the column in blue that is the “dif” one. This is the percentage that a player’s weak foot scores are of the dominant foot scores.  It is unusual for a youth player to reach the .90 (90%) level, highly unusual to get to .95.  We want every COE player to get to .90 and many to get to .95 if not better.